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Can NJ custodial parents freely relocate with their children?

We’ll just immediately respond to that headline-posed query above before moving on to an attendant narrative in today’s blog post.

Here’s the answer: Parental relocation with children is flatly a consideration with spelled-out judicial requirements in New Jersey. Moreover, we note on our website at the Somerville Law Office of Rajeh A. Saadeh that moving away with the kids is “one of the most contentious issues in family law.”

That is of course understandably so. The subject matter is at once complex, and often volatile. And it is unquestionably a topic that garners closest scrutiny from a New Jersey court in a given case.

We invite readers who would appreciate a bit of background information and history on the subject to peruse our September 28 post of last year. That entry focused closely on revised court guidelines addressing relocation. The bottom line is that a parent with a good-faith reason to move can do so, provided that affected children’s best interests are not adversely impacted by relocation.

That standard both clarifies and somewhat muddies the judicial waters at the same time. What qualifies as a good-faith reason? What plausible arguments against a move can an objecting parent make? What factors are applicable to the kids’ happiness and well-being?

A proven New Jersey family law attorney can be a strong ally for either a would-be relocating parent or an objecting mom or dad through persuasive arguments made to an overseeing court. Experienced legal counsel can also help negotiate a custody agreement and/or parenting plan that requires modification in the wake of a new court order.